Category Archives: News/Actualités

Day 7: What is a recipe?

Modest cup of tea with cakes. Credit: Upload Wizard, Wikimedia Commons.

By Rosie Redstone

Welcome to day 7 of our virtual conversation on ‘What is a Recipe?’

Today is a continuation of current projects and a few new ones:

  • “What’s the Recipe for a Recipe? From ancient medicine to women’s mags”, Alliterative Video (Mark Sundaram and Aven McMaster). You can watch on YouTube here, visit their website here or follow them on Twitter @AllEndlessKnot, @Alliterative or @AvenSarah
  • “A Pinch of This and a Handful of That: Food and Recipes in Kitchens of Rural North India”, Paveen Puneet and Priyanki S. Bishnoi. Visit Instagram @ppp_cookingchronicles
  • “Transcribing Early Modern Recipes at Guelph: Experiments and Inquiries”, Hillary Nunn, Amy Tigner, and Guelph Team. Find the blog post here.
  • “Reconstructing Recipes from an Eighteenth-Century Manuscript Recipe Book”, Katherine Allen. On Saturday, she was tweeting about the project here, Instagramming here and blogging here. And today’s contribution is a blog post here at The Recipes Project!
  • “Spuddenly Farming: A reconstruction of Rev. Mr. Cochran’s Potato experiment, 1791”, Siobhan Carlson. Follow on Twitter here or Instagram here.
  • The MMSH has revisited their initial post on what makes a good sound archive recipe — this time in French.
  • College of Physicians Philadelphia sharing recipe related items from their collection, particularly medical and scientific recipes. Follow on Twitter here or their blog here.
  • And yesterday on Twitter, Cardiff University Special Collections and Archives (@CUSpecialColls), University of Glasgow Archives and Special Collections (@UofGlasgowASC) and Thomas Fisher Library (@FisherLibrary) were tweeting about ink recipes!

 

The results from Kierri Price’s live-cooking!

In case you missed it, Kierri Price’s Live-Cooking event is now available on YouTube. We are editing it down, if you’re hoping for a snippet instead — but this was a lot of fun to watch, with contributions even from a three-year old who was joining in. Let there be sprinkles!

As always, comments, contributions, stray thoughts, questions, and anything else you wish to put forward are always welcome! Join us on twitter using #recipesconf, or comment on any one of the projects above. We look forward to hearing from you!

Day 4: What is a Recipe?

Page from Lady Ann Fanshawe’s recipe book. Credit: Wellcome Library, London.

On Tuesday, we had a lively discussion about favourite ingredients, interpreting changes in recipes, the role of expertise and tools, growing saffron, growing potatoes, the best cows for milk, and making bread, Folger Library highlights… (See here for Tallulah Maait Pepperell’s Storify account of Day 3!) We also had medieval friars practicing alchemy and time-travelling cookery here at The Recipes Project. If you missed our Twitter chat, you can catch up with the day in Tallulah Maait Pepperell’s Storify here.

Yesterday, we also launched a new storytelling event for the Virtual Conversation (on all month!): Cooking with Anger. Take out your list of ingredients and cook away in the form of a very short story in our comment section! The Wangensteen Library was also tweeting about chocolate (@umnbiomedlib), which inspires emotions of another sort…

Today, we are entering a world of sound and vision, as well as text:

  • Véronique Ginouvès (@Bagolina) discusses what is a recipe when it comes to the sound archives at the MMSH.
  • Marguerite Johnson (@MMJ722) has a podcast here on two cosmetic recipes in the poetry of Ovid, and discusses others over here on Storify.
  • Simon Walker, in a YouTube video,  prepares and reflects on a recipe for hard tack lemon pudding from the trenches of the First World War. He will also be chatting about recipes from this period on Twitter between 1 and 4 p.m. BST (@Dark_Nocterna)!
  • Louis Cilliers joins us here for a discussion of remedies to treat breast engorgement in Antiquity.
  • Siobhan Clark is back with her eighteenth-century potato growing experiment on Twitter @Spuddenly_Farm and Instagram @SpuddenlyFarming.
  • Lisa Smith will be discussing her class on The Digital Recipe Book Project and her students’ work on a seventeenth-century recipe book on Twitter (@historybeagle) throughout the day.

We hope to hear from you — in the comments, on Facebook, on Instagram, on Twitter…

Cooking With Anger

By Rob Wittig and Mark Marino

A frontal outline and a profile of faces expressing anger, by Charles Le Brun, 1713. Credit: Wellcome Library, London.

As part of the ‘What is a Recipe?’ Virtual Conversation, we’re pleased to introduce a story-telling game, called Cooking with Anger. And you can play it in the comments below!

We’ll keep bumping the post up so you can play from now until the end of the Virtual Conversation.

This is a creative game modelled on TV cooking competitions. Cooking with Anger is a netprov where storyteller chefs improvise a tale and a recipe from a given basket of ingredients. Many have written about cooking with love; now it’s time for all the other emotions.

How to Play

  1. Get a basket from the Protag-o-Matic ingredients machine.
  2. Copy and paste your basket at the top of your tale.
  3. Create a small dish of a stirring story — 300 words or less — using ALL the ingredients from your basket. Use people places and things as narrative; use food items for a recipe folded into the fiction. Season the tale with the emotional spice packet.
  4. Post your delectable concoction in the Comments section below.

To enjoy other story/recipes from last April’s version of this netprov, visit the Cooking With Anger website.

 

Day 3: What is a Recipe?

M. Darly, The Macrony Shoe Maker, 1775. Credit: Wellcome Library, London.

Come… make yourself comfy! Welcome to the third event day for our ‘What is a Recipe?’ Virtual Conversation. We’re looking forward to a a busy day ahead.

There are a few things to check out that happened yesterday. Emily Contois has a wonderful post on ‘Listening to the Voices in Historic Cookbooks‘, which discusses a recent weeklong recipes workshop she attended, but it also has a number of crossover themes with our ongoing conversation for ‘What is a Recipe?’. Hillary Nunn and Whitney Thompson had a Twitter bake-off of a seventeenth-century recipe; you can follow their experiment under #recipesconf. And Cardiff University Special Collections and Archives shared some recipe-related highlights from their collection (@CUSpecialColls).

Today, we’ll be hearing from…

If you want to pick up some themes from Day 2, check over here for Laurence Totelin’s helpful summary and Tallulah Maait Pepperell’s Storify.

UPDATE (June 19, 2017): A Storify of Day 3 by Tallulah is available over here.