Category Archives: News/Actualités

Day 9: What is a Recipe?

Ferdinand Wright, Summer Landscape, 1877. Credit: Wikimedia Commons.

We hope you’re still enjoying this brilliant weather and are equally as excited for our last big event day of the virtual conversation on ‘What is a Recipe?’. We’ve got some brilliant new topics coming your way and some of our oldies, but goodies, joining us too.

“Teaching Cookbooks: A Twitter Conversation on Food, Gender, History & Writing” from Emily Contois with the hashtag #teachingcookbooks. Twitter: @emilycontois and website: bit.ly/foodgender. Emily will be sharing her reading list, lesson plan, and teaching tips—plus some of her students’ cookbook analysis essays in a 24 hour twitter chat on the topic starting from 8am.

Credit: Katherine Hysmith.

“#FreeFireCider: Folk Herbalists, Feminist Hashtags, and the Instagram Modernity” from Katherine Cheyenne Hysmith. Twitter: @kchysmith, Instagram: @kchysmith and blog post here. Herbalists regard Fire Cider as a community-owned recipe but it has built up a commercial niche. Katherine will be exploring the historic “recipe” and how this community of shared knowledge deals with modern legal issues with a focus on the Instagram accounts of women folk entrepreneurs, how they use the hashtag #freefirecider in the hopes of winning back their recipe, and, in turn, help form a folk narrative within the Instagram modernity.

“Teaching Recipes: Recipes as Sources for Women’s Lives” from Rachel Snell.  Rachel blogs about her module here and shares the website of students’ work from “Food, Femininity, and Feminism in American Culture from Amelia Simmons to Martha Stewart”, which looks at the ways in which  the production and consumption of food fundamentally shaped concepts of femininity and feminism in American culture.

“‘Unboxing’ a new acquistion” from Wangensteen Historical Library of Biology and Medicine at the University of Minnesota. We’ll be witness to the ‘unboxing’ of a new French receipt book manuscript! Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/umnbiomedlib, Twitter: @umnbiomedlib, and Instagram: @umnlib.

From the Potato Experiment.

The “Spuddenly Farming: A reconstruction of Rev. Mr. Cochran’s Potato experiment, 1791” from Siobhan Carlson is back again with updates on the experiment! Siobhan will be on Instagram  @SpuddenlyFarming and Twitter @Spuddenly_Farm

“Henri’s Kitchen”, the final installment in which Harry Hayfield looks at Boeuf Bourginon through the eyes of his seventeenth-century musketeer, Henri.

“Recipes in the Early Royal Society Archives” from Sietske Fransen, who has been exploring the visual practice of the early Royal Society will be on twitter as @sietske_fransen and @MVCRASSH and her blog post on her archives tweets here.

Still ongoing we’ve got ‘Cooking With Anger’  where you can join the comments and create your own improvised recipe from a basket of ingredients. If you joined in Day 8’s discussions about fictional foods, you might enjoy taking a crack at ‘Cooking With Anger’.

In any case, make sure to check out Tallulah’s intriguing blog post about ‘Stories and memories: Day 8 of the Recipes Project’ where she explores all of the brilliant things which happened on Monday– including that extended discussion of fictional meals! She also discusses the focus on reconstructions, discussions of the ‘art’ of a good recipe and the connections between recipes and family history, and the many forms of recipes that appear in our daily lives.

It looks like there’s going to be a lot of themes today for our last big event day with focus on gender, community, improvisational cooking, digital recipes, and pedagogy cropping up already. We’ll have to see if we get reconstruction popping up again today…

We’ll see you again on the 10th with a final recording at the Wellcome Library.

Day 8: What is a Recipe?

Une Boulanger, A female Baker. Credit: Wellcome Library, London.

A lovely summer day ahead–what awaits us on Day 8 of ‘What is a Recipe?’ Lots of videos! And also bread and gingerbread, and more!

Let’s kick off with a blog post that takes us on a trip to Wales… Lisa Tallis, from the Special Collections and Archives at the University of Cardiff, offers a blog post on their delicious collections, from brewing to farriery. She examines recipes from the perspective of Welsh-English bilingualism and cross-cultural travel between the two countries.

The Wellcome Library will be joining from around 11:30 on Twitter (@WellcomeLibrary) to consider: what is a medieval recipe? How did medieval people create and use recipes?

Siobhan Carlson’s eighteenth-century potato experiment, ‘Spuddenly Farming’, continues on Twitter and Instagram. She includes some videos of her experiment to show the differences between the cuttings. Spoiler: it’s very noticeable! It certainly seems like there just might be a recipe for growing better potatoes…

Molly-Taylor Polesky has a lovely ‘Interview with a Baker’ on YouTube. She visited a historical bakery in Berlin (Alte Bäckerei Pankow) and spoke to a master baker there, who tells us (among other things) that ‘Recipes are an art.’ Make sure to turn on the Close Captioning for English subtitles!

Un Boulanger, A Baker
Credit: Wellcome Library, London.

 

Over at her new blog, Cooking up the Archives, Deborah Lawton will be exploring ‘A Recipe is a Tasty History Lesson’. Indeed.  In this she looks at a gingerbread recipe and how it provides opportunities to discuss wide-ranging historical information. (She also has a taster from last week in which she ruminates on #recipesconf.)

Gingerbread mould, Alsatian, 1650. Credit: Musée du pain d’épices et de l’art populaire alsacien.

Edith Snook and her team at the Early Modern Maritime Recipes project (Annabelle Babineau, Karim Baccouche, and Siobhan Carlson) will have a video on ‘Edward Winslow’s Receipt for Gingerbread Cakes’.  They will prepare a nineteenth-century recipe found in the account book of Loyalist and early Fredericton settler Edward Winslow. Along the way, they will think about  recipes and communities, how recipes bring things together—ingredients, tools, methods, flavours, tastes, people—and the tensions in these migrations across political, geographic, and cultural spaces.  (Link here.) You can also follow their discussion about the video on Twitter, with @BellePepper1, @Spuddenly_Farm, and @Pamphilia2.

Maria Galanaki shares video of ‘A Hippocratic Menu’ on YouTube (here). In this, she demonstrates the preparation of three recipes–a starter, a main course, and a dessert—using ingredients reported in the Hippocratic Regimen.

And from ancient Greece, we head to the trenches of the First World War with Simon Walker who will have a video on ‘Classic French Soldiers’ Food’ for his series Feeding Under Fire. (Link to the video here.) He will also be joining in to discuss his video on Twitter as @Dark_Nocterna.

If you haven’t yet tried it, I encourage you to try ‘Cooking with Anger‘. Get your list of emotional ingredients from the Protag-o-matic and write a VERY short story in the blog post comments. After all, as the German Master Baker says, ‘Recipes are art.’

Lots to keep us busy at #recipesconf today. Please do come join in the conversation in the comments below, on Twitter (@historecipes and #recipesconf), or at the individual projects. We’d love to hear from you!

 

 

Day 7: What is a recipe?

Modest cup of tea with cakes. Credit: Upload Wizard, Wikimedia Commons.

By Rosie Redstone

Welcome to day 7 of our virtual conversation on ‘What is a Recipe?’

Today is a continuation of current projects and a few new ones:

  • “What’s the Recipe for a Recipe? From ancient medicine to women’s mags”, Alliterative Video (Mark Sundaram and Aven McMaster). You can watch on YouTube here, visit their website here or follow them on Twitter @AllEndlessKnot, @Alliterative or @AvenSarah
  • “A Pinch of This and a Handful of That: Food and Recipes in Kitchens of Rural North India”, Paveen Puneet and Priyanki S. Bishnoi. Visit Instagram @ppp_cookingchronicles
  • “Transcribing Early Modern Recipes at Guelph: Experiments and Inquiries”, Hillary Nunn, Amy Tigner, and Guelph Team. Find the blog post here.
  • William Burdette launches his Food Moves project, which looks at his family’s rolodex of recipes within a historical and digital context. Vimeo here and website here.
  • “Reconstructing Recipes from an Eighteenth-Century Manuscript Recipe Book”, Katherine Allen. On Saturday, she was tweeting about the project here, Instagramming here and blogging here. And today’s contribution is a blog post here at The Recipes Project!
  • “Spuddenly Farming: A reconstruction of Rev. Mr. Cochran’s Potato experiment, 1791”, Siobhan Carlson. Follow on Twitter here or Instagram here.
  • The MMSH has revisited their initial post on what makes a good sound archive recipe — this time in French.
  • College of Physicians Philadelphia sharing recipe related items from their collection, particularly medical and scientific recipes. Follow on Twitter here or their blog here.
  • And yesterday on Twitter, Cardiff University Special Collections and Archives (@CUSpecialColls), University of Glasgow Archives and Special Collections (@UofGlasgowASC) and Thomas Fisher Library (@FisherLibrary) were tweeting about ink recipes!

 

The results from Kierri Price’s live-cooking!

In case you missed it, Kierri Price’s Live-Cooking event is now available on YouTube. We are editing it down, if you’re hoping for a snippet instead — but this was a lot of fun to watch, with contributions even from a three-year old who was joining in. Let there be sprinkles!

As always, comments, contributions, stray thoughts, questions, and anything else you wish to put forward are always welcome! Join us on twitter using #recipesconf, or comment on any one of the projects above. We look forward to hearing from you!

Day 4: What is a Recipe?

Page from Lady Ann Fanshawe’s recipe book. Credit: Wellcome Library, London.

On Tuesday, we had a lively discussion about favourite ingredients, interpreting changes in recipes, the role of expertise and tools, growing saffron, growing potatoes, the best cows for milk, and making bread, Folger Library highlights… (See here for Tallulah Maait Pepperell’s Storify account of Day 3!) We also had medieval friars practicing alchemy and time-travelling cookery here at The Recipes Project. If you missed our Twitter chat, you can catch up with the day in Tallulah Maait Pepperell’s Storify here.

Yesterday, we also launched a new storytelling event for the Virtual Conversation (on all month!): Cooking with Anger. Take out your list of ingredients and cook away in the form of a very short story in our comment section! The Wangensteen Library was also tweeting about chocolate (@umnbiomedlib), which inspires emotions of another sort…

Today, we are entering a world of sound and vision, as well as text:

  • Véronique Ginouvès (@Bagolina) discusses what is a recipe when it comes to the sound archives at the MMSH.
  • Marguerite Johnson (@MMJ722) has a podcast here on two cosmetic recipes in the poetry of Ovid, and discusses others over here on Storify.
  • Simon Walker, in a YouTube video,  prepares and reflects on a recipe for hard tack lemon pudding from the trenches of the First World War. He will also be chatting about recipes from this period on Twitter between 1 and 4 p.m. BST (@Dark_Nocterna)!
  • Louis Cilliers joins us here for a discussion of remedies to treat breast engorgement in Antiquity.
  • Siobhan Clark is back with her eighteenth-century potato growing experiment on Twitter @Spuddenly_Farm and Instagram @SpuddenlyFarming.
  • Lisa Smith will be discussing her class on The Digital Recipe Book Project and her students’ work on a seventeenth-century recipe book on Twitter (@historybeagle) throughout the day.

We hope to hear from you — in the comments, on Facebook, on Instagram, on Twitter…