Around the Table: Celebrating Our Contributors

By Sarah Peters Kernan

Before the new academic year begins, the Recipes Project would like to celebrate the many accomplishments of our contributors from the past year! Our community has been busy publishing, securing new jobs and fellowships, enjoying promotions, and more. We heartily congratulate all of you for your successes; the breadth of your interests and experiences make the Recipes Project an exciting and enriching endeavor!

We also welcome contributors to share your news with the Recipes Project community throughout the entire year on Twitter or Facebook!

Katherine Allen works as an administrator at the University of Oxford and runs a blog about sustainability, baking, and low waste living (raspberrythriller.wordpress.com). Popular posts include Minimalism – Helpful or Detrimental to Sustainabile Living? and Zero Waste Toiletries, and she has also written collaborative posts with the Recipes Project such as Innovative Ingredients or Old Remedies?.

Miranda Brown published “Mr. Song’s Cheeses: Southern China, 1368-1644” in Gastronomica: The Journal of Critical Food Studies 19, no. 2 (2019). The article reconstructs a long forgotten cheesemaking tradition in South China. It represents the first installment of a book-length project on the history of dairy in China.

Anny Gaul defended her dissertation, “Kitchen Histories in Modern North Africa,” at Georgetown University in Washington DC in May 2019. She will be starting a postdoctoral fellowship in Culture, History, and Translation this fall at Tufts University in Boston.

Marieke Hendriksen will soon begin a new position as researcher at the Humanities Cluster of the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences in Amsterdam. She recently published two articles: “Animal Bodies Between Wonder and Natural History: Taxidermy in the Cabinet and Menagerie of Stadholder Willem V (1748-1806)” in the Journal of Social History 52, no. 4 (2019); and “Casting Life, Casting Death: Connections Between Early Modern Anatomical Corrosive Preparations and Artistic Materials and Techniques” in Notes and Records. The Royal Society Journal of the History of Science (published online 3 April 2019).

Elaine Leong received the History of Science Society’s Margaret W. Rossiter History of Women in Science Prize for her book, Recipes and Everyday Knowledge: Medicine, Science, and the Household in Early Modern England (University of Chicago Press, 2018). She also co-edited Working with Paper: Gendered Practices in the History of Knowledge (University of Pittsburgh Press, 2019) with Carla Bittel and Christine von Oertzen.

Jennifer Munroe has recently published several articles. With Rebecca Laroche, she published “Pest Control” in Lesser Living Creatures: Insect Life in the Renaissance, edited by Joseph Campana and Keith Botelho (Penn State University Press, forthcoming). Also with Rebecca Laroche, she published “Teaching Environmental Justice and Early Modern Texts: The ‘Co’ in Collaboration” in Teaching Social Justice Through Shakespeare, edited by Wendy Beth Hyman and Hillary Eklund (Edinburgh University Press, forthcoming). Jennifer also published “Women and Gardens” as part of the “30 Years, 30 Ideas” Series in Women Writers in Context and “Digital Studies at the Margins: Manuscript Sources and Inclusivity.” in Shakespeare Newsletter 67, no. 2 (2018).

Melissa Reynolds completed her PhD in history at Rutgers University this year. She has been named a Cotsen Postdoctoral Fellow in Humanities and a Lecturer in History at Princeton University. Melissa also recently published “‘Here is a Good Boke to Lerne’: Practical Books, the Coming of the Press, and the Search for Knowledge, ca. 1400–1560” in the Journal of British Studies 58, no. 2 (April 2019).

Anne Stobart, a coordinator of the Herbal History Research Network (HHRN), is celebrating the organization’s tenth anniversary this fall. Since 2009, the HHRN has organized seminars and study days on topics ranging from botanical garden history to distillation of herbal medicines and more. Starting in 2017, the HHRN set up a regular online blog for researchers to share best practice in their use of original herbal resources such as medical texts and recipes.

Molly Taylor-Poleskey published “A Baker, the Great Elector and Prussian Statebuilding: Territorial Integration in the Everyday” in German History (February 2019). She also interviewed Jodi Campbell about her new book for New Books in History PodcastAt the First Table: Food and Social Identity in Early Modern Spain (29 January 2019). Molly also contributed a book chapter, “When the Tomato was Purely Ornamental: Considering New World Foods in Seventeenth-Century Berlin” in Transatlantic Trade and Global Cultural Transfers, edited by Martina Kaller and Frank Jacob (Routledge, 2019).

Amy Tigner recently published Literature and Food Studies, co-authored with Allison Carruth (Routledge, 2018). She also published “Trans-border Kitchens: Iberian Recipes in Seventeenth-Century English Manuscripts” in a special issue on “Food Distribution” edited by Vicki Howard and Jon Stobart in the History of Retailing and Consumption 5.1 (2019).

Laurence Totelin was promoted to Reader in Ancient History at Cardiff University’s School of History, Archaeology and Religion.

The Early Modern Recipe Online Collective Steering Committee (and Recipes Project contributors) co-authored a recent article. Rebecca Laroche, Elaine Leong, Jennifer Munroe, Hillary Nunn, Lisa Smith, and Amy Tigner authored “Becoming Visible: Recipes in the Making” in Early Modern Women: An Interdisciplinary Journal 13, no. 1 (2018).

If you’d like to feature a project, scholar, or institution on Around the Table, please email Sarah Kernan.


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.