From the dry sands of Egypt… Greek medicine labels on papyrus

By Isabella Bonati Amongst the many objects depicted in the “unswept floor” mosaic by Heraclitus (II cent. CE) there is a drug container (unguentarium) with a narrow, probably folded, papyrus tag suspended from its neck. This tag likely offered the identification of the content, possibly an ointment or some aromata, stored into the unguentarium. This … Continue reading From the dry sands of Egypt… Greek medicine labels on papyrus

Ancientbiotics: Medieval Medicines for Modern Infections

By Erin Connelly In 2015, Youyou Tu jointly won the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for the development of a new therapy (Artemisinin) to treat Malaria, a disease which has been on the rise since the 1960s. Significantly, the antimalarial component was successfully extracted from the plant Artemisia annua only after consulting the instructions … Continue reading Ancientbiotics: Medieval Medicines for Modern Infections

New Digital Tools for the History of Medicine and Religion in China

Originally posted on China Policy Institute: Analysis By Michael Stanley-Baker When we do textual research on China, we rely on canons that were made with paper. The gold standard for a digital corpus is that it is paired with images of a citeable physical text produced in known historical conditions: at a specific time and … Continue reading New Digital Tools for the History of Medicine and Religion in China

Writing Early Modern Medicine for Medical Readers

By Alisha Rankin Years ago, in a recipe collection belonging to Countess Elisabeth of the Palatinate (1552-90), I found a fascinating entry: a copy of an official document that described trials of a poison antidote on dogs, which I described in a post on this blog. My interest in that document has expanded into an … Continue reading Writing Early Modern Medicine for Medical Readers