New Work Forum: On Food and Religion in Cevasco’s Violent Appetites

By Eleanor Barnett Violent Appetites begins with an account from the Presbyterian missionary Samuel Kirkland’s time living among a Seneca family in the 1760s. During his mission, hunger would afflict both Kirkland and his hosts at various points, but they would diverge in how that hunger was understood and experienced. To colonists like Kirkland, Native …

Religion Mixed with Food: Turrón de Doña Pepa

By Michelle M. M. Hancock A palette of colors, scattered like confetti decorate a signature Peruvian dessert. The flavored pastry, called the Turrón de Doña Pepa or Ms. Pepa’s Nougat, contains basic ingredients such as flour, water, shortening, butter, sugar, salt and eggs. A range of ingredients including anise, cinnamon, cloves, oranges, apples, figs, limes …

New Digital Tools for the History of Medicine and Religion in China

Originally posted on China Policy Institute: Analysis By Michael Stanley-Baker When we do textual research on China, we rely on canons that were made with paper. The gold standard for a digital corpus is that it is paired with images of a citeable physical text produced in known historical conditions: at a specific time and …

New Work Forum: Continuing the Conversation About Hunger in Violent Appetites

By Carla Cevasco Long before Violent Appetites was a book, it existed in conversation with classmates and colleagues, conference audiences, the other scholars I read and cited, and with readers at The Recipes Project. So it is a joy to return to the conversation here with such a brilliant and generous group of scholars. I …

Search OpenEdition Search

You will be redirected to OpenEdition Search