New Digital Tools for the History of Medicine and Religion in China

Originally posted on China Policy Institute: Analysis By Michael Stanley-Baker When we do textual research on China, we rely on canons that were made with paper. The gold standard for a digital corpus is that it is paired with images of a citeable physical text produced in known historical conditions: at a specific time and … Continue reading New Digital Tools for the History of Medicine and Religion in China

Charmed: into the Spellbound exhibition at the Ashmolean Museum, Oxford

Kristof Smeyers Entering the ‘Spellbound’ exhibition, you are confronted with a ladder leaning against a wall like a menacing question mark. There is no avoiding this ladder. Do you walk under it or do you go round? Even before you are inside the Ashmolean’s exhibition space, ‘Spellbound’ asks big questions about magic, ritual, and witchcraft. … Continue reading Charmed: into the Spellbound exhibition at the Ashmolean Museum, Oxford

Food and Embodied Identities in the Early Modern and Modern World, c. 1500 – c. 2000: conference report

By Rachel Rich Katrina Mosley and Eleanor Barnett, who run the Cambridge Body and Food Histories Group, hosted a conference on ‘Food and Embodied Identities in the Early Modern and Modern World, c. 1500 – c. 2000’ on June 29th, 2018. These kinds of conferences, where everyone is in the same room so that conversations … Continue reading Food and Embodied Identities in the Early Modern and Modern World, c. 1500 – c. 2000: conference report

Medieval charms: magical and religious remedies

By Véronique Soreau Charms are incantations or magic spells, chanted, recited, or written. Used to cure diseases, they can also be a type of medical recipe.[1]  Such recipes were often described as charms in their title and linked to a ritualistic form of language intertwined with religion, medicine and magic. The charms of a Middle … Continue reading Medieval charms: magical and religious remedies