New Digital Tools for the History of Medicine and Religion in China

Originally posted on China Policy Institute: Analysis By Michael Stanley-Baker When we do textual research on China, we rely on canons that were made with paper. The gold standard for a digital corpus is that it is paired with images of a citeable physical text produced in known historical conditions: at a specific time and … Continue reading New Digital Tools for the History of Medicine and Religion in China

Food and Embodied Identities in the Early Modern and Modern World, c. 1500 – c. 2000: conference report

By Rachel Rich Katrina Mosley and Eleanor Barnett, who run the Cambridge Body and Food Histories Group, hosted a conference on ‘Food and Embodied Identities in the Early Modern and Modern World, c. 1500 – c. 2000’ on June 29th, 2018. These kinds of conferences, where everyone is in the same room so that conversations … Continue reading Food and Embodied Identities in the Early Modern and Modern World, c. 1500 – c. 2000: conference report

Medieval charms: magical and religious remedies

By Véronique Soreau Charms are incantations or magic spells, chanted, recited, or written. Used to cure diseases, they can also be a type of medical recipe.[1]  Such recipes were often described as charms in their title and linked to a ritualistic form of language intertwined with religion, medicine and magic. The charms of a Middle … Continue reading Medieval charms: magical and religious remedies

Bibulous Erasmus

Brian Cummings Ars longa, vita brevis, as you hear every day in the tearoom at the Folger Shakespeare Library. This Christmas at the Folger I made a discovery which made me feel young: Erasmus’s favourite wine! The thought had been with me since I heard a disputation at the British Academy, years ago, between Eamon … Continue reading Bibulous Erasmus