Water to Drink: Fit Only for Invalids and Chickens?

By David Gentilcore  When the French Dominican Jean-Baptiste Labat was captured by the Spanish in the 1690s, and offered water to drink aboard ship, he informed the chaplain that ‘only invalids and chickens drink water in my country’ (Labat 1722). Perhaps this comes as no surprise. If people in past times drank plenty of wine and … Continue reading Water to Drink: Fit Only for Invalids and Chickens?

Introducing the Summer University on Food and Drink Studies

Graham Harding (Oxford) and Beat Kümin (Warwick) Founded in 2001, the European Institute for the History and Cultures of Food (IEHCA) has become a major research and public engagement hub. It runs an annual open convention, thematic colloquia and numerous outreach and heritage activities. Based at Tours in France, it collaborates with the city, region, … Continue reading Introducing the Summer University on Food and Drink Studies

Teaching Chocolate from the Bean to Drink

By Amy L. Tigner Making chocolate from bean to bar has become fashionable both in cottage industries, such as the delightful husband and wife shop, El Buen Cacaco, in Idyllwild, California that creates a wickedly hot Ghost Chocolate Bar made with bhut jolokia (aka ghost chili). In 2016, Carol Wiley listed 183 bean to bar chocolatiers on … Continue reading Teaching Chocolate from the Bean to Drink

More Links for What is a Recipe?

In case you missed them, check out the following posts… Katie Birkwood at the Royal College of Physicians London looks at early modern pharmacopoeia and wonders how important provenance is in establishing what is or isn’t a recipe. Hannah Salisbury at the Essex Records Office delves into their collections for ‘A Taste of the Past’. … Continue reading More Links for What is a Recipe?