Blood, Controversy, and Puddings in the Early English Atlantic

By Carla Cevasco How to follow the Word of the Bible and still tuck into a nice blood pudding? This question inspired the Massachusetts Puritan minister Increase Mather to publish a brief pamphlet in 1697 entitled “A Case of Conscience Concerning Eating of Blood, Considered and Answered.” The conundrum, Mather wrote, lay in the injunction from … Continue reading Blood, Controversy, and Puddings in the Early English Atlantic

From bloodstone to fish soup: iron recipes

By Marieke Hendrikksen In my research on the use of metals in eighteenth-century medical chemistry, iron has a special place. Unlike other metals, which were increasingly regarded as dangerous, iron remained a safe bet in blood-related diseases. However, up until the early nineteenth century, this understanding was not so much based on a chemical understanding … Continue reading From bloodstone to fish soup: iron recipes

Pigeon Blood Visine?: An Early Modern Eye Wash

By Jennifer Sherman Roberts Close your eyes and imagine a chicken. Now a duck. Now a turkey. Now a pigeon. If this little experiment has worked the way I envisioned, when you thought of a pigeon you didn’t just think of a different bird but of a different environment. You likely pictured chickens and ducks … Continue reading Pigeon Blood Visine?: An Early Modern Eye Wash

Building Community Through Recipe Sharing

By Sara de Blas Hernández All of the famous cookbooks emerging in early modern Spain were written by men who worked for the royal court: Libro de guisados (1529) was written by Roberto de Nola, Arte de cocina, pasteleria, vizcocheria, y conserveria (1611) by Francisco Martínez Montiño, and Arte de repostería (1747) by Juan de … Continue reading Building Community Through Recipe Sharing