Seasonality and the (Re)creation of Early Modern Color Worlds

By Jenny Boulboullé Color played an important role in the early modern world across a number of areas from arts and crafts to Christian religion to politics to natural history and philosophy. In recent years, scholars have begun to explore how early modern men and women engaged, produced and conceptualized colors within and across color … Continue reading Seasonality and the (Re)creation of Early Modern Color Worlds

Burnt Toast, Medicine and Identity in (Early Modern?) England

by Giovanni Pozzetti Last Monday the Food Standards Agency (FSA) in the UK launched the ‘go for gold’ campaign to promote awareness in the kitchen when cooking foods at high temperatures. Results of a study conducted on mice showed how foods with a high content of acrylamide can be related to cancer. Acrylamide is a … Continue reading Burnt Toast, Medicine and Identity in (Early Modern?) England

Searching for Syphilis in Recipe Books

By Olivia Weisser I have been on the search for syphilis – or venereal disease as it was known in England in the 1600s and 1700s. In that era, there was one broad disease category, “venereal disease,” for what we know now to be different STDs. Personal writing about venereal disease can be challenging to find because the disease … Continue reading Searching for Syphilis in Recipe Books

From Dificio di ricette to Bâtiment des recettes: The Afterlife of Italian Secrets in France

By Julia Martins In 1525 a book called Opera nuova intitolata dificio di ricette was published in Venice. The book promised to reveal all kinds of secrets to the reader, from cosmetic to medical recipes. This anonymous Italian best seller (which we may call in English ‘Palace of Recipes’) was a collection of 187 short … Continue reading From Dificio di ricette to Bâtiment des recettes: The Afterlife of Italian Secrets in France