How an American Became ‘The French Chef’

By Juliet Tempest There can be no better description of Julia Child than “meticulous.” Indeed, Amy Vidor and Caroline Barta describe her thus in their delightful post this month. They review the history of Child’s success in circulating French cuisine in the U.S. As they discuss, Child held the highest respect for the integrity of … Continue reading How an American Became ‘The French Chef’

Slow-Churn Democracy: Ice Cream in 18th and 19th c. America

Kelly K. Sharp As a historian of antebellum foodways of Charleston, South Carolina, it’s a pleasure for me to bring my work home with me — my husband and colleagues have endured historic recipes for cornbread (it was intolerably dry), sweet potato pudding (surprisingly boozy), and spring pea purloo with Carolina Gold rice (pleasantly creamy). … Continue reading Slow-Churn Democracy: Ice Cream in 18th and 19th c. America

Vast and Bewildering: Early America at The Recipes Project

By Carla Cevasco From the outside, the field of early American studies still looks an awful lot like the Founding Fathers. (Even if they have a catchy soundtrack.) But this white, wealthy, male stereotype is no small source of frustration to those of us who study the global connections and collisions that make up #vastearlyAmerica. … Continue reading Vast and Bewildering: Early America at The Recipes Project

American Bitters

By David Shields  Nowadays bitters are an aroma and a flavor used in building cocktails, or a digestif taken in small doses after heavy meals. Prior to the twentieth century they were a medicinal infusion of vegetable material in alcohol. In the Galenic humoral system, they countered an excess of choler or bile in one’s … Continue reading American Bitters